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    01:10 PM Singapore Law Blog

    Submissions open for the TrustLaw Index of Pro Bono 2016

        

    Do you know that in 2015 lawyers around the world donated 2 million hours of free legal support? These are just some of the fascinating findings of our TrustLaw Index of pro bono, the ultimate survey mapping legal pro bono work around the world. Now, submissions are open for the 2016 survey.

    With the rapid spread of pro bono beyond traditional strongholds such as the US, Australia, South Africa and the UK, there is indeed growing demand for accurate data mapping trends and tracking the level of pro bono engagement across the globe. 

    Pro bono is growing around the world and data plays a key role in supporting this trend”, says Serena Grant, Director of TrustLaw.  “The Index allows us to get fascinating insights into many aspects of pro bono: from whether firms have appointed a pro bono coordinator, to the amount of hours donated. In turn, this information supports those advocating for better resources, and ultimately become key benchmarks to assess how the practice is evolving”.

    The Thomson Reuters Foundation launched the TrustLaw Index of Pro Bono in 2014 to provide analysis on the key national, regional and global trends shaping the pro bono marketplace, and to assess the pro bono participation of law firms on a country by country basis. 

    “Acclaimed pro bono surveys have long collected data on a national basis in markets such as England and Wales, the US, Australia and even in parts of Latin America. Yet, there was not a comprehensive report mapping trends and measuring pro bono engagement on a global basis until we created the TrustLaw Index of Pro Bono. The Index fills that gap”, adds Nicholas Glicher, Legal Director at TrustLaw, “allowing us to unearth relevant, yet previously unexplored trends in pro bono markets from Cambodia to Germany to Colombia

    The TrustLaw Index of Pro Bono also recognises the role of local law firms in advancing pro bono, especially in jurisdictions such as India, which restrict the operation of foreign law firms. The findings challenge the conventional notion that international law firms are better resourced to commit to pro bono practices. Rather, the TrustLaw Index of Pro Bono is a platform where firms of all shapes and sizes can share their experience and expertise.

    This year, TrustLaw will collect pro bono data from more jurisdictions and law firms to build a broader picture of the global pro bono landscape. Law firms are invited to submit their pro bono data through an online survey before 23 May 2016.

    Findings of the 2016 TrustLaw Index of Pro Bono will be published on 18 July 2016.

    “More and more around the world, barriers to pro bono are falling, participation is up, and lawyers are excited to make a difference in their jurisdictions and beyond.  This sea change is happening in no small part thanks to the TrustLaw Index of Pro Bono. It is an aspirational tool for us to gauge how we’re doing, and inspires us to do more”, commented Louis O’Neill, Pro Bono Counsel, White & Case LLP, in anticipation of the 2016 TrustLaw Index of Pro Bono. 

    To arrange an interview with Serena Grant, Director of TrustLaw, or Nicholas Glicher, Legal Director at the Thomson Reuters Foundation, please contact Trang Chu Minh (trang.chuminh@thomsonreuters.com / +44 207 542 9634)

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